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Learning jQuery Intro Class

jquery A self-study class ($25) enabling students to learn at their own pace includes five lessons guiding you how you can enhance your JavaScript development by learning the basics of the JavaScript library jQuery.

This class is geared for web designers to help and learn how to use jQuery to enhance existing web pages as well as web developers to teach them how to use a very popular and powerful JavaScript library.

Using raw JavaScript can result in dozens of lines of code for each of these tasks. The creators of jQuery specifically created the library to make common tasks trivial. The class will be teaching not only how to use the many functions and properties of API, but practical examples you can use right away. Read more ›


Learning WordPress Intro Class


wordpress_introA self-study class ($25) enabling students to learn at their own pace includes six lessons guiding you step-by-step through all of the basic aspects of WordPress development.

This introduction WordPress class will teach students how to setup a WordPress from installation, administration, customizing with plugins and themes and understanding how to optimize with SEO techniques. Read more ›


Learning Drupal Intro Class


drupalA self-study class ($25) enabling students to learn at their own pace includes six lessons guiding you step-by-step through all of the basic aspects of Drupal development.

This introduction to Drupal class will teach students the main components of a Drupal installation such as administration, themes, modules, taxonomy, content types, and views in eventually creating a fully working website in the final lesson. Read more ›


Learning JavaScript Intro Class

Javascript A self-study class ($25) enabling students to learn at their own pace includes seven lessons guiding you through the foundation of modern programming practices on the client browser using JavaScript.

This introduction JavaScript class will take the novice with no programming experience at all get up to speed on how JavaScript can quietly be used with HTML and CSS to really make your pages standout. Today’s JavaScript is not about opening popup windows, browser detection, mouse-rollovers and the like, but is understanding how to allow your content layer (“HTML”) and presentation layer (“CSS”) to work seamlessly and unobtrusively with your behavior layer (“JavaScript”). Read more ›


JavaScript Tip: Is Random Really Random?

As random as random can be.

A computer cannot generate a truly random number because computation is deterministic: it follows an unbroken chain of cause and effect in which no truly random events ever occur. Instead, it uses a set of complex algorithms to generate what’s known as a pseudorandom number — a number that gives the appearance of randomness, and is good enough for any practical purpose.

This produces a number between zero and one (excluding either limit). Read more ›


JavaScript Tip: Submitting a Form by Enter key

Depending on the browser type and configuration, pressing the Enter key while in a form does not always submit the form. Sometimes, for instance, the button that submits the form resides in another frame. In that case, adding a bit of JavaScript to ensure that the Enter key sends the form data, as well, comes in handy.

All that is necessary to implement for that function is a standard key listener: Keyboard events are not part of DOM Level 1 or Level 2, but are still implemented in recent browsers.

Accessing the event differs from the usual approach (window.event in Internet Explorer; the event as the automatic parameter of the function in all other browsers). Read more ›


JavaScript Tip: Waiting for the DOM to Load

As we have started to learn about the DOM this season, one thing that is an issue when developing your scripts is knowing when you can have your scripts execute. Remember, the DOM is available to you only when it has finished loading in the browser. You may ask, when has it finished loading? Good Question!

The order of completion that takes place inside a browser is roughly:

1. HTML is parsed
2. External scripts/style sheets are loaded
3. Scripts are executed as they are parsed in the document
4. DOM is fully constructed
5. Images and external content are loaded
6. The page is finished loading
Read more ›


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